California brick
CALIFORNIA BRICKS


Inglewood Brick and Tile Company

California Enamel Brick Company

Advertisement from the Los Angeles City Directory, 1913
Advertisement from the Los Angeles City Directory, 1913

History


In 1912, the Inglewood Brick and Tile Company was incorporated in Los Angeles with a capital stock of $400,000. This company was sometimes known by other names such as the Inglewood Brick Company or the Inglewood Brick and Clay Products Company. The directors were A.F. Andres, R.B. Andres, C.P. Campbell, Milton Bartley, and C.C. Spicer. An affiliated company was formed at the same time and named the California Enamel Brick Company, with a capital stock of $250,000. The directors were A.F. Andres, C.P. Campbell, A.C. Myers, and J.W. Hislop. Both companies built their plants on the same property in Inglewood, Los Angeles County, California. The office of the companies was initially at 456 South Spring Street in Los Angeles, but was moved in 1913 to 702 West 7th Street, and in 1914 to 311 1/2 South Spring Street in Los Angeles. The products of the brick and tile plant included common, clinker, sewer, high-grade pressed, ruffled, and blue bricks. The enamel plant was to make enameled brick, wall tiling and terra cotta. Their high-grade pressed brick sporting the diamond logo is described below.

The plants were built in January of 1913, and two additional kilns and new machinery were added in April of 1914. Clay was obtained from Alberhill in Riverside County and transported to the plants at Inglewood by the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway Company. The plant was reported to have an output of 2 million bricks a day with 65 workers. The tile plant, which was said to cost $350,000, employed 150 workers. Enamel bricks however were not produced until April 1914 and only a very small quantity was made. Other bricks were shipped locally to building projects in the Los Angeles area, but because of the short life of the company, the overall quantity of bricks was probably small.

The company began experiencing financial difficulties in November 1913, when it filed a formal complaint about high transportation rates by the railroad company to the State Public Utilities Commission. The Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway Company was charging $1.50 per ton of clay from Alberhill to Los Angeles, and the company thought that 78 cents per ton was a more reasonable rate. Although the Inglewood Brick and Tile Company withdrew its complaint before a decision was made, the Commission agreed with the brick company and ordered the railroad company to lower its rates. In May 1914, the brick company filed a certificate of bonded indebtedness to the amount of $150,000. The company also forteited its charter for nonpayment of the corporation tax for 1914. A change of directorship of the brick company in 1915 resulted in dissolving the company and closing the brickyard.

Inglewood Pressed Brick


The Inglewood pressed brick is buff and of very good quality. The surface is smooth with minor crackles and pits. The edges are straight and sharp and the corners are sharp when not broken. On the surface can be seen tiny brown iron oxide freckles (less than 1/16 inch in diameter) and in places fine granular clay. One of the faces contains a centered recessed diamond frog that is 5 3/8 inches in length and 2 1/2 inches in width and 1/8 inch in depth. Centered in the bottom of the frog is the company name INGLEWOOD recessed in block letters that span 4 inches in length, and 1/2 inch in height. Above and below the name are round raised screw imprints 1/4 inch in diameter. The interior contains about 5 percent subangular, gray, translucent quartz and black iron oxide specks, all less than 1/16 inch in diameter, in a granular, subrounded, cream, alumina clay body. This brick was made using the dry-pressed process. Length 7 7/8, width 3 3/4, height 2 1/4 inches.

View of the marked face of the Inglewood Brick and Tile Company pressed brick.
View of the marked face of the Inglewood Brick and Tile Company pressed brick. Collection of Lucia.

View of the unmarked face of the Inglewood Brick and Tile Company pressed brick.
View of the unmarked face of the Inglewood Brick and Tile Company pressed brick.

View of the side of the Inglewood Brick and Tile Company pressed brick.
View of the side of the Inglewood Brick and Tile Company pressed brick.

View of the surface of the Inglewood Brick and Tile Company pressed brick.
Close-up view of the surface of the Inglewood Brick and Tile Company pressed brick.

View of the interior of the Inglewood Brick and Tile Company pressed brick.
View of the interior of the Inglewood Brick and Tile Company pressed brick.

Microscopic view of the interior of the Inglewood Brick and Tile Company pressed brick.
Microscopic view of the interior of the Inglewood Brick and
Tile Company pressed brick (50x, field of view is 1/4 inch).


Other brick types made by this company are not yet available for description.

References

Brick and Clay Record, v. 42, no. 1, 1913, p. 89.

Brick and Clay Record, v. 43, no. 9, 1913, p. 923.

Brick and Clay Record, v. 44, no. 8, 1914, p. 954.

Brick and Clay Record, v. 44, no. 9, 1914, p. 1065.

Brick and Clay Record, v. 46, no. 2, 1915, p. 180.

California Railroad Commission Decisions, California Public Utilities Commission, v. 4, 1914, p. 268-277.

Incorporation Whirl, American Globe, v. 8, no. 1, October 1915, p. 8.

Los Angeles City Directories, 1912-1915.

Between the City and the Sea, Los Angeles Times, January 1, 1913.

Recent Incorporations, Brick and Clay Record, v. 40, no. 12, 1912, p. 550.

The Public Service, Los Angeles Times, May 30, 1916.

Copyright 2014 Dan Mosier

Contact Dan Mosier at danmosier@earthlink.net.